Dr Eugenio Galindo
Dr. Eugenio Galindo - Network Annual Report

Dr. Eugenio Galindo Awaits Next Month’s American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network Annual Report

Texas oncologist Dr. Eugenio Galindo looks toward American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network’s ‘How Do You Measure Up?’ report due to be published next month.

 

eugenio galindo
Eugenio Galindo

‘How Do You Measure Up?’ is an annual report compiled by the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, detailing where each U.S. state stands on critical issues impacting cancer patients and survivors. Oncology specialist Dr. Eugenio Galindo, who serves the Rio Grande Valley area of South Texas, reveals more about the upcoming report.

 

“Now in its 17th year, the 2019 American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network ‘How Do You Measure Up?’ report will be published next month,” Dr. Galindo explains.

 

The annual report, he says, focuses on preventing new cases of cancer, developing innovative cures and treatments, and ensuring that all cancer patients in America have access to the lifesaving medical care which they need. “State legislators play an essential role in this fight,” adds the cancer specialist.

 

According to respected oncology specialist Dr. Galindo, laws passed at state and local levels drastically help to improve the lives of both cancer patients and cancer survivors, and, supported by the work of the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, play a vital role in the nationwide fight against the disease.

 

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network is the nation’s leading cancer advocacy group, working to save lives through involvement, influence, and impact, according to the organization. “The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network is a nonprofit, nonpartisan advocacy affiliate of the American Cancer Society,” Dr. Galindo further explains.

 

“The network works tirelessly to educate the public, elected officials, and candidates on cancer’s dreadful toll on public health, encouraging them to make the disease a top priority,” he adds.

 

Dr. Eugenio Galindo, meanwhile, is an experienced physician specializing in oncology, certified through the American Board of Internal Medicine. Dr. Galindo has served in the Rio Grande Valley area for almost 30 years and is an active participant in bringing the latest in cancer treatment and screening to the southernmost tip of South Texas. The doctor has also authored several influential medical publications on the subject of oncology.

 

Last year’s 68-page American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network ‘How Do You Measure Up?’ report focused on access to care, increased access to Medicaid, cancer pain control, palliative care, and tobacco excise taxes, among numerous other important topics.

 

“The 2018 report also addressed breast and cervical cancer early detection programs and access to colorectal screening,” adds Dr. Galindo, wrapping up, “something which I hope to see more of in this year’s report, due to be published next month.”

 

‘How Do You Measure Up? A Progress Report on State Legislative Activity to Reduce Cancer Incidence and Mortality, 2019’ will be published in August.

Dr. Eugenio Galindo - Melanoma Warning Signs

Dr. Eugenio Galindo Outlines Primary Melanoma Warning Signs

Oncologist Dr. Eugenio Galindo reveals key warning signs for the deadliest form of skin cancer.

 

eugenio galindo
eugenio galindo

The least common but most deadly form of skin cancer, more than 7,000 Americans will lose their lives to melanoma this year based on the latest estimates. A prominent cancer specialist serving the Rio Grande Valley area of South Texas, Dr. Eugenio Galindo outlines a number of key warning signs for the deadly disease.

 

“Melanoma accounts for only around one percent of all skin cancer cases, but the overwhelming majority of skin cancer deaths,” reveals Dr. Galindo.

 

This year, it’s estimated that, out of 96,480 newly diagnosed cases, 7,230 people in the United States will die as a result of melanoma, according to the AIM at Melanoma Foundation. “Despite incredible advances in cancer diagnosis, treatment, and research, melanoma continues to kill as many people as it did more than 30 years ago,” Dr. Galindo explains.

 

In fact, the number of diagnosed cases is up significantly in recent years, he says. “With this in mind, it’s more important than ever that people are familiar with the primary warning signs,” adds the cancer specialist, “of melanoma, especially as, when caught early, the disease is highly treatable.”

 

The American Cancer Society promotes what it calls the ‘ABCDE’ rule for identifying melanoma warning signs. A through E, these are asymmetry, border, color, diameter, and evolving. “Asymmetry is where a part of a mole doesn’t match the rest,” explains Dr. Galindo, “while border refers to watching for edges which become, or start to appear, irregular or blurred.”

 

“Color,” he continues, “should be similarly uniform, and if a mole appears to consist of different shades of brown or black, or there are patches of red, pink, blue, or white, there may be cause for concern.”

 

Of diameter, Dr. Galindo goes on to explain that where a mole, or another area of new skin discoloration, is larger than a quarter of an inch across, an expert opinion should be sought to rule out the possibility of melanoma. “The same,” he adds, “is true of moles or areas of discoloration which have become noticeably larger over time.”

 

Lastly, Dr. Galindo touches on what the American Cancer Society calls ‘evolving.’

 

“The spread of pigment into surrounding skin from a mole or spot, or any redness, represents what we call evolving,” he explains, “and must be investigated.”

 

Further to asymmetry and border, color, and diameter changes, plus the evolution of spots, moles, or other areas of discoloration of the skin, Dr. Galindo also highlights a number of further potential warnings signs. “A sore that won’t heal, unusual swelling, or sensation changes in the skin around moles or birthmarks should also be looked at,” he adds, “as should any tenderness, itchiness, bleeding, or pain.”

 

If an individual or a friend or family member observe any one or more of these symptoms in themselves or someone else, it’s important, says Dr. Eugenio Galindo, that they seek medical attention.

 

“Doing so could very well save your life,” he adds, wrapping up, “or the life of a much-loved family member or friend, so it’s essential to remain vigilant for the warning signs of melanoma.”

Dr. Eugenio Galindo - Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Awareness Day

Dr. Eugenio Galindo Reveals Details of Upcoming Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Awareness Day

Oncology specialist Dr. Eugenio Galindo shares details of annual Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Awareness Day, organized by the Life Raft Group.

Dr. Eugenio GalindoOn Sunday, July 13, 2014, the Life Raft Group celebrated the very first global Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Awareness Day. The mission of the group is to enhance survival and quality of life for people living with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor diagnosis through patient-powered research, education, empowerment, and global advocacy efforts. Oncologist Dr. Eugenio Galindo takes a closer look at the awareness initiative.

“In 2013, the Life Raft Group launched its ‘Rare 13’ campaign, highlighting and drawing attention to the fact that 13 people are diagnosed with gastrointestinal stromal tumors in the United States every day,” explains Dr. Galindo. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Awareness Day has been held annually, on July 13, each year since.

A gastrointestinal stromal tumor is a form of tumor which occurs in the digestive tract, such as the stomach or small intestine. “Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are most often diagnosed in patients aged over 40,” reveals Dr. Galindo, “but, occasionally, younger adults and children may also develop such tumors.”

Around 5,000 new cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumor, also known as gastrointestinal stromal neoplasm and gastrointestinal stromal sarcoma, are currently diagnosed each year in the United States. “Prognosis and treatment options vary depending upon how quickly the cancer cells are growing, the size of the tumor, whether it has spread, and whether it can be completely removed via surgery,” Dr. Eugenio Galindo explains.

In addition to surgery, three further options are commonly made available to patients. These are targeted therapy, supportive care, and what’s known as watchful waiting, according to Dr. Galindo.

Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Awareness Day 2019 will be held on Saturday, July 13.

Dr. Galindo has previously shared details of Oral Cancer Awareness Month in April, Skin Cancer Awareness Month in May, and National Cancer Survivors Day in June, held annually on the first Sunday of the month. July, meanwhile, also plays host to UV Safety Awareness Month, the goal of which is to spread the word about how vital protection from the harmful effects of UV rays really is, and the link between excessive UV exposure and skin cancer.

Later in the year, September marks National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, Childhood Cancer Month, Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month, and Leukemia and Lymphoma Awareness Month. Next, October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, while November marks Lung Cancer Awareness Month and Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month, according to Dr. Galindo.

Dr. Eugenio Galindo is an experienced physician specializing in oncology, certified through the American Board of Internal Medicine. Dr. Galindo has served in the Rio Grande Valley area for almost three decades and is an active participant in bringing the latest in cancer treatment and screening to the southernmost tip of South Texas. Fluent in English and Spanish, Dr. Galindo has also authored several influential medical publications on the subject of oncology.

To learn more about Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Awareness Day and the Life Raft Group, visit https://liferaftgroup.org/about-gist-awareness-day/.

Eugenio Galindo

Dr. Eugenio Galindo looks toward UV Safety Awareness Month

Oncology specialist Dr. Eugenio Galindo reveals details of upcoming UV Safety Awareness Month.

With July marking UV Safety Awareness Month each year in the United States, Dr. Eugenio Galindo is keen to share details of the annual awareness initiative. A prominent oncology specialist serving the Rio Grande Valley area of South Texas, Dr. Galindo explains more about UV exposure and its links to skin cancer.

“It’s important to be safe in the sun,” says Dr. Galindo, “but there’s more to UV Safety Awareness Month than just this simple message.”

“The goal of UV Safety Awareness Month is to spread the word about how vital protection from the harmful effects of UV rays really is, not just in July, but year-round,” adds the oncologist.

UV light from the sun, as well as from tanning beds, is a form of radiation, classified by wavelength: UVA, UVB, and UVC. “All UVC light from the sun is blocked by the ozone layer, but not UVB or UVA,” reveals Dr. Galindo. Both UVA and UVB, he says, are closely associated with skin cancer development.

“What’s most surprising to many people, however,” says Dr. Galindo, “is that artificial UV light, such as that from tanning beds, is often the most dangerous, particularly in terms of causing cancer.”

Indeed, the American Academy of Dermatology suggests that tanning beds may be directly responsible for as many as 400,000 new cases of skin cancer in the United States each year.

According to the American Cancer Society, meanwhile, a total of more than 5 million basal skin cancer cases, and approximately 3.3 million squamous cell skin cancer cases are diagnosed annually, with excessive UV exposure playing a part in many.

“In addition to causing skin cancer, excessive UV exposure is also responsible for causing cataracts and other eye damage, premature aging of the skin, immune system suppression, and a variety of further health complaints and conditions,” Dr. Eugenio Galindo adds.

As such, he says, it’s important to ensure a level of protection from harmful UV rays wherever possible. “Avoid the bright midday sun, especially during the summer, stay away from indoor tanning beds, and always remember sunscreen,” advises the specialist cancer doctor.

UV Safety Awareness Month is promoted each July by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Cancer Society, and the Oncology Nursing Society, as well as the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, and the U.S. Forest Service, among various other organizations.

Dr. Eugenio Galindo is an experienced physician specializing in oncology, certified through the American Board of Internal Medicine. Dr. Galindo has served in the Rio Grande Valley area for almost three decades and is an active participant in bringing the latest in cancer treatment and screening to the southernmost tip of South Texas. Fluent in English and Spanish, Dr. Galindo has also authored several influential medical publications on the subject of oncology.

Dr. Eugenio Galindo- New Breast Cancer Drug

Dr. Eugenio Galindo Takes a Closer Look at New Breast Cancer Drug Tested in Texas

Oncologist Dr. Eugenio Galindo provides a professional look at a brand new advanced breast cancer drug, recently trialed in Texas.

 

eugenio galindo
eugenio galindo

A revolutionary new drug, recently tested in Texas, could provide help to tens of thousands of women living with advanced breast cancer, according to Dr. Eugenio Galindo. Touted to support the management of the disease, without reliance on painful, traditional treatments, such as intravenous chemotherapy, the oncology specialist provides a closer look at the recently trialed drug, known as alpelisib.

 

The drug, alpelisib, branded Piqray by pharmaceutical company Novartis, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration at the end of May. “Piqray has already demonstrated success in clinical trials, conducted, in part, here in the state of Texas,” explains Dr. Galindo, a prominent oncologist serving the Rio Grande Valley area of South Texas for almost 30 years.

 

According to the specialist, certain patients diagnosed with metastatic hormone receptor-positive breast cancer are likely eligible for treatment with the new drug. “It does remain, however, that only a specific subset of cancer patients, with PIK3CA gene mutation, are suitable,” adds Dr. Galindo, “yet this still represents many, many thousands of women who are diagnosed every year in the United States.”

 

Alpelisib is claimed by Novartis, as Piqray, to help manage advanced breast cancer. “The drug is designed to stop tumor growth,” Dr. Galindo explains, “allowing patients to live normal lives, without having to endure traditional and encumbering therapies, such as intravenous chemotherapy.”

 

Cancer treatments, he suggests, are, in general, moving in this direction. “Newer drugs, such as alpelisib, are targeted to specific tumor traits on a molecular level,” reveals the expert.

 

Combined with hormone therapy, recent Piqray trials carried out in Texas and elsewhere in the U.S. are reported by Novartis to demonstrate, potentially, almost doubled progression-free survival. “Furthermore, upwards of one-third of patients who partook in the trial witnessed their tumors shrink,” adds Dr. Galindo, “and, in some cases, disappear, according to Novartis.”

 

Novartis, or Novartis International AG, is a multinational pharmaceutical company based in Basel, Switzerland, and one of the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies by market capitalization and sales. Novartis is a member of the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations, the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations, and Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America.

 

“Early results, as they pertain to alpelisib, or Piqray, are incredibly positive,” Dr. Galindo suggests, wrapping up, “which provides great hope for those diagnosed with various forms of breast cancer, today and in the future, and further demonstrates the critical importance of ongoing cancer research, both here in Texas and across America, as well as globally.”

 

Dr. Eugenio Galindo is an experienced physician specializing in oncology, certified through the American Board of Internal Medicine. Dr. Galindo has served in the Rio Grande Valley area for almost three decades and is an active participant in bringing the latest in cancer treatment and screening to the southernmost tip of South Texas. Fluent in English and Spanish, Dr. Galindo has also authored several influential medical publications on the subject of oncology.

Dr. Eugenio Galindo

Dr. Eugenio Galindo Celebrates National Cancer Survivors Day

Earlier this month, Dr. Eugenio Galindo and McAllen Oncology celebrated National Cancer Survivors Day from the cancer center’s all-new, state-of-the-art facility in the South Texas, Rio Grande Valley area city of McAllen. Here, the oncology specialist reveals more about the annual event, held each June to celebrate, inspire, and support cancer survivors and those recently diagnosed with the disease.

“National Cancer Survivors Day is a celebration for those who’ve survived cancer, an inspiration for those recently diagnosed, a gathering of support for families, and an outreach to the community,” reveals Dr. Galindo, an experienced and widely regarded oncologist serving the Rio Grande Valley area of South Texas for almost 30 years. “The day is meant,” he continues, “to demonstrate that life after a cancer diagnosis can be a reality.”

National Cancer Survivors Day is celebrated annually on the first Sunday in June, primarily and predominantly by residents of the United States, although efforts are being made to grow the day’s popularity in other countries around the world. These include Canada, the Cayman Islands, Trinidad, Tobago, Italy, India, Malaysia, Australia, and South Africa, among others.

The inaugural National Cancer Survivors Day was held in 1988. “Ever since then, local towns and cities, hospitals, and support groups have hosted events and celebrations each year on the first Sunday of June,” Dr. Galindo reveals.

Celebrations, he says, can include carnivals, parades, contests, art exhibitions, and testimonies honoring local cancer survivors. Dr. Galindo and his team recognized this year’s National Cancer Survivors Day at McAllen Oncology’s brand new cancer center, first unveiled to patients and their families earlier this year. The state-of-the-art facility boasts an innovative community infusion center, private suites, a diagnostic imaging center, its own laboratory, and more.

Dr. Galindo has recently marked both Oral Cancer Awareness Month, in April, and Skin Cancer Awareness Month, in May. “Next month, July plays host to Sarcoma Awareness Week,” adds the oncology specialist, wrapping up, “while September, a little later in the year, marks awareness initiatives for childhood and gynecologic cancers, Hodgkin’s lymphoma, leukemia, and thyroid and prostate cancer.”

National Cancer Survivors Day is a service of the National Cancer Survivors Day Foundation, Inc., a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization. To find out more, please head https://www.ncsd.org/about-us.

Dr. Eugenio Galindo is an experienced physician specializing in oncology, certified through the American Board of Internal Medicine. Dr. Galindo has served in the Rio Grande Valley area for almost three decades and is an active participant in bringing the latest in cancer treatment and screening to the southernmost tip of South Texas. Fluent in English and Spanish, Dr. Galindo has also authored several influential medical publications on the subject of oncology. For the latest from Dr. Eugenio Galindo and McAllen Oncology, visit https://www.facebook.com/McAllenOncology/.

Dr. Eugenio Galindo looks back on cancer center grand opening earlier this year

Dr. Eugenio Galindo

Oncologist Dr. Eugenio Galindo reflects on McAllen Oncology’s all-new cancer center grand opening celebration.

Unveiled to over 375 patients and their families earlier this year, McAllen Oncology’s all-new cancer center in McAllen, Texas, was opened to great fanfare in mid-January. A veteran of the field for more than 30 years, McAllen Oncology’s Dr. Eugenio Galindo looks back on the highly successful event, staged in association with the city’s Chamber of Commerce.

“January saw myself and the team at McAllen Oncology kick off 2019 in great style,” explains Dr. Galindo, “opening our revolutionary all-new cancer center to former and current patients, their families, and a number of prominent figures from the city.”

With close to 400 patients and their families in attendance, the January 11th event went off without a hitch. “It really was an amazing day,” adds Dr. Galindo of the grand opening celebration. “At McAllen Oncology,” he goes on, “we offer complete cancer care in a state-of-the-art facility which includes an innovative community infusion center with private suites and a diagnostic imaging center and laboratory.”

According to Dr. Galindo, McAllen Oncology is the only cancer center of its kind, not just in McAllen, but across all of South Texas. “Our ribbon cutting was a great way to start the new year,” says the oncology specialist of the event, which was held alongside a number of other ribbon cutting, ground-breaking, and further official celebrations and events arranged in association with the McAllen Chamber of Commerce during the month of January.

These included the Rio Grande Regional Hospital ground-breaking, the Mediforce, LLC grand opening and ribbon cutting, the Jalapenos Bar & Grill grand re-opening and ribbon cutting, RGV Electrical Supply’s grand opening and ribbon cutting, and Ric Brown Family Funeral Home’s 1st year anniversary, plus grand opening and ribbon cutting events at ProSports Massage Clinic and Skinn Bar.

Boasting a membership of more than 2,000, the McAllen Chamber of Commerce was first established in the mid-1920s as an evolution of what was then known as the ‘McAllen Businessmen’s Club,’ which, 13 years prior, and founded in 1911, drove much of the initial creation of the city of McAllen which residents know and love today.

“The largest chamber in a 15 county area, I’m proud to say,” Dr. Eugenio Galindo adds, wrapping up, “that the city’s Chamber of Commerce is widely regarded as the most innovative, cutting edge, and progressive chamber in the region, which is great news for us here in McAllen.”

Dr. Eugenio Galindo is an experienced physician specializing in oncology, certified through the American Board of Internal Medicine. Dr. Galindo has served in the Rio Grande Valley area for almost three decades and is an active participant in bringing the latest in cancer treatment and screening to the southernmost tip of South Texas. Fluent in English and Spanish, Dr. Galindo has also authored several influential medical publications on the subject of oncology.

For the latest from McAllen Oncology, please head to https://www.facebook.com/McAllenOncology/.

Dr. Eugenio Galindo - National Cancer Survivors Day

Dr. Eugenio Galindo Looks Forward to National Cancer Survivors Day

Oncology specialist Dr. Eugenio Galindo reveals more about National Cancer Survivors Day which takes place early next month.

 

eugenio galindo
eugenio galindo

With Sunday, June 2, 2019, marking National Cancer Survivors Day in the United States and elsewhere around the world, Dr. Eugenio Galindo offers a closer look at the annual celebration of life, held each year on the first Sunday of the month of June.

 

“National Cancer Survivors Day is a celebration for those who’ve survived the disease, an inspiration for those who’ve been recently diagnosed, a gathering of support for affected families, and an outreach effort to the community,” reveals Dr. Galindo, an oncologist serving the Rio Grande Valley area of South Texas for almost three decades.

 

Overseen by the National Cancer Survivors Day Foundation, the day provides an opportunity for all individuals living with a history of cancer to connect, celebrate milestones, and recognize those who have supported them on their journey.

 

“Recognizing America’s more than 15.5 million cancer survivors, National Cancer Survivors Day is also an opportunity to draw attention to the persistent challenges of cancer survivorship, and a chance to promote further research, resources and survivor-friendly legislation intended to improve cancer survivors’ quality of life,” Dr. Galindo adds.

 

He continues, “Anyone can host a National Cancer Survivors Day event, held each year on the first Sunday in June, with simple steps available online from the National Cancer Survivors Day Foundation surrounding how best to organize a successful event in your local community.”

 

The nonprofit National Cancer Survivors Day Foundation provides free education, guidance, and networking to hundreds of support groups, hospitals, and other cancer-related organizations across the United States. “The foundation also works to improve the quality of life of cancer survivors,” Dr. Galindo reveals, “by raising awareness of the ongoing challenges faced by those living each day with a history of the disease.”

 

National Cancer Survivors Day 2019 takes place on Sunday, June 2. The cause is supported by American pharmaceutical firm Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, California-based oncology-focused biotechnology company Exelixis, Swedish radiation therapy company Elekta, Janssen Global Services, Takeda Pharmaceutical Company, and Coping with Cancer, the premier magazine for people touched by the disease.

 

Dr. Eugenio Galindo is an experienced physician specializing in oncology, certified through the American Board of Internal Medicine. Dr. Galindo has served in the Rio Grande Valley area for almost 30 years and is an active participant in bringing the latest in cancer treatment and screening to the southernmost tip of South Texas. Fluent in English and Spanish, Dr. Galindo has also authored several influential medical publications on the subject of oncology.

 

National Cancer Survivors Day is an annual service of the National Cancer Survivors Day Foundation, Inc., a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization headquartered in Franklin, Tennessee. To make a tax-deductible donation to the National Cancer Survivors Day Foundation, please head to https://www.ncsd.org/.

Dr. Eugenio Galindo explores primary skin cancer risk factors

Dr. Eugenio Galindo

South Texas cancer specialist Dr. Eugenio Galindo explains primary risk factors for melanoma, nonmelanoma, and other forms of skin cancer.

From basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the skin to melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer, skin cancer can strike in any one of several forms. With May marking Skin Cancer Awareness Month in the United States, oncologist Dr. Eugenio Galindo offers a closer professional look at the primary risk factors for the disease.

The abnormal growth of skin cells, skin cancer most often develops on skin which is routinely exposed—or has been exposed—to the sun. Sun exposure is not, however, the only risk factor for the disease, and, according to Dr. Galindo, this common form of cancer may also occur on areas of the skin which are not routinely exposed to sunlight.

“While exposure to the sun is among the most significant risk factors for skin cancer, staying out of the sun’s often harmful ultraviolet rays is not the only way to help reduce the risk of developing the condition,” he explains.

Being aware of, and regularly checking for, any changes in the skin can help massively in detecting skin cancer during its earliest stages. “This,” says Dr. Eugenio Galindo, “without a doubt gives skin cancer patients the best possible chance of successful treatment.”

Symptoms and underlying causes of the various forms of skin cancer differ, although many of the risk factors are shared, according to the Rio Grande Valley area oncologist.

These include fair skin, excessive sun exposure, use of tanning lamps and tanning beds, a history of sunburn, living in a particularly sunny or high-altitude climate, and a prevalence of moles on the body. Further risk factors extend to what are known as precancerous skin lesions or actinic keratoses, a weakened immune system, a personal history of skin cancer, a family history of skin cancer, exposure to radiation—including radiation treatment for skin conditions such as acne and eczema—and exposure to certain substances, such as arsenic.

To limit the risk of developing skin cancer, particularly in light of the above, Dr. Galindo recommends avoiding the midday sun wherever possible, wearing sunscreen year-round, avoiding tanning beds, and checking one’s skin regularly. Particular attention should be paid, he says, to the face, neck, ears, scalp, chest, arms, hands, and legs, both front and back, as well as checking for any changes to existing freckles, birthmarks, or moles.

“You must,” he adds, wrapping up, “check your skin regularly, and be absolutely sure to report any noticeable changes, however minor they may seem, to your doctor as a priority.”

National Skin Cancer Awareness Month, overseen by organizations including the American Academy of Dermatology, the American Association for Cancer Research, and the Skin Cancer Foundation, runs until the end of May.

Dr. Eugenio Galindo is an experienced physician specializing in oncology, certified through the American Board of Internal Medicine. Dr. Galindo has served in the Rio Grande Valley area for almost 30 years and is an active participant in bringing the latest in cancer treatment and screening to the southernmost tip of South Texas. Fluent in English and Spanish, Dr. Galindo has also authored several influential medical publications on the subject of oncology.

DR. EUGENIO GALINDO HIGHLIGHTS SKIN CANCER AWARENESS MONTH

Dr. Eugenio Galindo highlights Skin Cancer Awareness Month
Oncologist Dr. Eugenio Galindo shares details of annual Skin Cancer Awareness Month in the United States.

Overseen by organizations including the American Academy of Dermatology, the American Association for Cancer Research, and the Skin Cancer Foundation, the month of May marks annual Skin Cancer Awareness Month in the United States. A cancer specialist certified in medical oncology through the American Board of Internal Medicine, Dr. Eugenio Galindo reveals more about the awareness initiative.

“In the United States, most cases of melanoma—the deadliest form of skin cancer—can be attributed to UV or ultraviolet exposure,” reveals Dr. Galindo, an experienced oncology specialist diligently serving Texas’ Rio Grande Valley, including Hidalgo, Cameron, Willacy, and Starr counties, for close to three decades.

Also promoted by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Cancer Prevention and Control department, Skin Cancer Awareness Month—or Melanoma and Skin Cancer Awareness Month—is, in part, intended to highlight the incredible importance of sun protection.

“UV exposure remains the most preventable risk factor for skin cancer,” explains Dr. Galindo. “Throughout May,” he continues, “the American Academy of Dermatology is asking the public, ‘Do you use protection?’ and is encouraging everyone to practice what the organization calls ‘safe sun’ every time they’re outdoors.”

Indeed, the American Academy of Dermatology advises—when outdoors during the daytime in bright, hot, or even just clear weather—wearing suitably protective clothing, seeking shade where possible, and applying a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with SPF 30+ to reduce the risk of developing skin cancer. “Everyone needs to use sun protection,” adds Dr. Galindo, “no matter what their age, gender, or race.”

Skin Cancer Awareness Month also exists to promote skin cancer screening, a better understanding of the types of skin cancer, skin cancer detection, other forms of prevention, the dangers of indoor tanning, and to share skin cancer stories.

Several different forms of skin cancer exist, including melanoma, squamous cell skin cancer, and basal cell skin cancer. “With more than 5 million skin cancer cases diagnosed in the United States every year, it’s the most common form of cancer in the country,” Dr. Galindo explains.

“Thankfully, however, it’s also one of the most preventable forms of the disease,” he adds, wrapping up, “which is why it’s vital that we promote initiatives such as Skin Cancer Awareness Month to continue to highlight the risks, to change potentially dangerous behaviors, and to save lives in the process.”

Dr. Eugenio Galindo is an experienced physician specializing in hematology and oncology. Certified in medical oncology through the American Board of Internal Medicine, Dr. Galindo has served in the Rio Grande Valley for almost 30 years. The medical director for McAllen Oncology, he completed his fellowship at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center and is an active participant in bringing the latest in cancer treatment and screening to the southernmost tip of South Texas. Fluent in English and Spanish, Dr. Galindo has also authored several influential medical publications on the subject of oncology.